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UK plans to build world’s largest wood-burning power plant

The Tees Renewable Energy Plant (REP), which will be located in the Port of Teesside, Middlesbrough, will be the world’s largest biomass power plant with a capacity of 299 MW, ZME Science has reported.

While the plant is designed to be able to function on a wide range of biofuels, its main intended power sources are wood pellets and chips, of which the plant is expected to use more than 2.4mt a year.

The feedstock will be sourced from certified sustainable forestry projects developed by the MGT team and partners in North and South America, and the Baltic States, and supplied to the project site by means of ships.

Investment in the renewable project is estimated to reach £650m, which will be partly funded through aids from the European Commission, and construction works would create around 1,100 jobs.

Environmental technology firm Abengoa, based in Spain, along with Japanese industry giant Toshiba will be leading the project for their client, MGT Teesside, subsidiary to the British utility MGT Power.

The feedstock will be burned to generate steam at 565°C that will drive a steam turbine, which will rotate the generator to produce electricity.

The generated power will be conveyed to the National Grid. The exhaust steam generated by the steam turbine plant will be condensed by the ACCs and re-used, whereas the flue gases from the CFB boiler will be discharged via the exhaust stack.

Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) emissions will be minimised by using capture technology, fabric filters will reduce emission of particulate matter or dust and check the sulphur content of the fuel feed, while sulphur dioxide (SO2) emissions will be reduced through limestone injection into the boiler.

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