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Doubts raised over Olympic legacy

Research released today by a recruitment website has found that two-thirds of the industry is sceptical about the long-term employment legacy of the Olympics.

However, the findings, from a survey of hundreds of professionals by Careerstructure.com, show that a similar number of respondents feel UK property skills and experience will be valued abroad after the delivery of the Games.

UK contractors are currently eyeing up opportunities for major works around the Rio 2016 Games and the deconstruction and restoration work in London.

Three-quarters of those surveyed said the boost to jobs would not last three years, with a quarter saying it would be over in less than a year.

The site’s director Richard Nott said the survey showed that although the Games provided “a much-needed boost to jobs in the property sector in the short term”, most believed the legacy regeneration plans would not sustain the boost.

He continued: “Recent announcements from government of more funding and the relaxing of planning laws are moves which perhaps have greater potential to deliver growth in jobs in the long term, but an immediate, tangible impact is not being felt.”

The findings listed civil engineering, project management and architecture as the sectors most likely to be permanently boosted by the Olympics.

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