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AHU issue within next ErPD update

NG Bailey has highlighted the general lack of realisation over the next update to the Energy-related Products Directive (ErPD) and their implications, particularly for air handling units (AHUs).

The company’s central engineering design and development manager Will Pitt – a member of the H&V News editorial advisory board – shared the technical bulletin he prepared by his company to help draw attention to the issue.

“It has become clear that there is a widespread lack of awareness of the changes which are due to come into force on 1st January 2016,” he said.

“I’ve put together an internal briefing for our business as they are likely to have both design and cost implications,” said Mr Pitt.

The bulletin states that all AHUs will need to be ErP compliant from January and this will involve a “cost uplift and will also require a greater footprint” to the increased efficiencies required.

These are included within Lot 6 of the directive, which focuses on minimum performance levels for ventilation units and implemented between 2016 to 2018.

Mr Pitt’s ErPD technical bulletin is reproduced below.

“There is clearly still quite a lot of work to be done to ensure all manufacturers are up to speed with this important new legislation,” said Lochinvar managing director David Pepper.

He further stated that manufacturers had already conducted “expensive testing”, however, absorbing the cost without passing these on to contractors, and also added:

“All manufacturers do have a duty to provide contractors with the data they need to ensure products are compliant.”

 

18th November 2015

Technical Bulletin

Energy Related Products Regulations And Air Handling Units

 

1. Introduction

The purpose of this technical bulletin is to provide an overview of the key requirements of the EcoDesign Directive and the Energy-Related Products Directive (ErP)specifically in relation to Air Handling Units.

All air handling units supplied and installed from the 1st January 2016 must conform to the legislative requirements of the EcoDesign Directive and the Energy-Related Products Directive. ErP compliant air handling units will have a cost uplift and will also require a greater footprint in order to meet the increased efficiencies of the regulations.

All tenders must ensure that AHU quotations include for ErP compliant air handling units.

 

2. What is Eco design and ErP?

The Eco-Design Directive establishes an EU-wide framework for setting minimum energy efficiency standards for energy related products. It aims to improve the energy efficiency of products throughout their life-cycle and includes provisions to enforce the use of EU energy labelling. The Directive has been transposed into law in the UK by the Eco-Design for Energy-Related Products Regulations 2010.

 

3. What is Eco design Directive Lot 6?

For practical reasons, the implementation of the Eco design Directive is split into a number of areas of related products, called ”lots”, focusing on the product areas with the most substantial energy consumption and the highest potential for energy savings. Lot 6 concerns ventilation units, a highly relevant product area, since ventilation, heating and air conditioning represents about 15% of the total energy consumption in the EU, and there is a wide variance in energy efficiency among the products on the market. The Eco design Directive Lot 6 will achieve its target by setting up minimum performance requirements for ventilation products, which will be implemented in steps from 2016 to 2018.

 

4. Classification

Ventilation units are classified either as “Residential Ventilation Units” (RVU) or “Non

Residential Ventilation Units” (NRVU). NRVU units means any unit above 250 m3/h and in the instance where a manufacturer has not declared its product range with air volume ranging from 250 m3/h up to 1000 m3/h as being for residential use only, the product range falls into the NRVU classification automatically.

Most units supplied and installed by NG Bailey will fall under the category of NRVU’s.

 

5. Exemptions

_ Fans in a casing according to 327/2011 and with a power input of less than 30W;

_ ATEX Directive (explosive atmospheres);

_ Fans required for emergency situations;

_ Certain extreme temperatures;

_ Power supply voltages greater than 1000V AC or 1500V DC;

_ In toxic, corrosive, inflammable environments or in environments with abrasive

materials;

_ Ventilation systems that include a heat exchanger and a heat pump for heat recovery. Note a DX heating and cooling coil is not heat pump heat recovery.

_ Kitchen fans.

 

6. Requirements for Non Residential Ventilation Unit (NRVU)

a) All ventilation units, except fans with more than one range of application (for example fans used for both ventilation and combustion gas extraction) shall be equipped with a step-by-step or a variable speed controller i.e. inverter control.

b) All ventilation units with two directions of airflow shall have a heat recovery system.

The Directive definition for ‘heat recovery system’ (HRS) means the part of a bidirectional ventilation unit equipped with a heat exchanger designed to transfer the heat contained in the contaminated exhaust air to the fresh supply air.

c) The heat recovery system shall have a thermal bypass. This means heat recovery regulation between 1-100%. Acceptable solutions include: Face and by pass on Plate

Heat Exchangers, speed controller on Rotary Thermal Wheels and on/off control on

Run-Around Coil pumps. Although it is not explicitly stated in the directive, it is believed that a mixing box does not constitute heat recovery.

The Directive definition of “thermal by-pass” is any solution that circumvents the heat exchanger or controls automatically or manually its heat recovery performance, without necessarily requiring a physical airflow bypass (for example: summer box, rotor speed control, control of air flow);

d) In ventilation units with two directions of airflow, the minimum thermal efficiency of all heat recovery systems (except run-around liquid systems) shall be the following:

• As from 1 January 2016: Min. 67%

• As from 1 January 2018: Min. 73%

Note: These minimum efficiencies are to be based on equal balance air volumes and are above the UK Part L2 2013 minimum requirements (current Part L2:- 50% for PHE, 65% for RTW).

Note: There may be project specific heat recovery efficiencies in the thermal model to achieve ADL2/EPC targets.

e) In ventilation units with two directions of airflow, the minimum thermal efficiency of run-around liquid heat recovery systems shall be the following:

• As from 1 January 2016: Min. 63%

• As from 1 January 2018: Min. 68%

Note: These minimum efficiencies are to be based on equal balance air volumes and are above the UK Part L2 2013 minimum requirements (current Part L2:- 45% for RAC).

Note: There may be project specific heat recovery efficiencies in the thermal model to achieve ADL2/EPC targets.

f) The ratio between the internal limit specific fan power (SFPint_limit) and the heat recovery system’s efficiency is specified in a formula. For example, if the efficiency of the heat recovery system is higher than 67%, a higher specific fan power (SFPint_limit) is permissible. This requirement will be implemented in two steps. The first step will be implemented on 1 January 2016, and the second, with more stringent demands, on 1 January 2018.

g) Unidirectional ventilation units (UVU’s) intended to be used with a filter have a

SFPint_limit of 250 W/m3/s.

There is also a limiting fan efficiency for UVU’s. A formula within annex iii must be used to calculate the limiting fan efficiency for units below 30kW. Above 30KW, the limiting efficiency is 63.1%.

Unidirectional ventilation unit (UVU) means a ventilation unit producing an air flow in one direction only, either from indoors to outdoors (exhaust) or from outdoors to indoors (supply), where the mechanically produced air flow is balanced by natural air supply or exhaust;

Estimators:

When receiving quotes from AHU manufacturers please ensure they:-

a) Confirm the SFP Internal limit (int_limit)

b) Demonstrate that the proposed unit SFPint is less than the calculated limit using

the methodology described in the ErP Regulations.

 

7. Design Implications (detail removed for legal reasons)

 

8. Electrical Motors

Regulation (EU) No 640/2009: Eco-design requirements for electric motors for AHU fans shall be applied in accordance to the following timetable:

1. From 1st January 2015, motors with a rated output of 7.5 to 375kW shall be IE3 level or IE2 equipped with a variable speed drive

2. From 1st January 2017, motors with a rated output power of 0.75 to 7.5kW shall be

IE3 level or IE2 equipped with a variable speed drive.

9. ErP Regulations and Part L Building Regulations

Compliance with the ErP Regulations is in addition to the Building Regulations Part L2 2013.

SFPint_limit is specific to the individual ventilation equipment and should not be confused with the Part L Specific Fan Power which is based on the entire ventilation system.

 

Produced by: Will Pitt, NG Bailey Central Engineering